Editors’ Blog

Photo Essays Archive

The Notes We Carry: Other People’s Love Letters

Monday, February 4th, 2008

A Western Union telegram from the 1940s. An “I Love You” scribbled in red pen on a book of matches from the late ’90s. A postcard, Post-it note, fraying napkin. An email, text message or string of emoticon. A million IMs. These are the shapes and forms, spanning nearly a century, of the myriad testimonials of the heart and head in Other People’s Love Letters: 150 Letters You Were Never Meant to See, edited by Bill Shapiro.

The To-Do List Book

Thursday, December 27th, 2007

To-Do: Read Sasha Cagen’s To-Do List Book.
I need to start writing more, going to bed before 5 am, and making it to dance class. I need to stop biting my nails, procrastinating, and forgiving people who lie to me.
This time of year, almost everyone is composing a wish list. What I want from Santa gives [...]

Full On With Leonard Nimoy

Saturday, December 1st, 2007

By Marilyn Wann
Leonard Nimoy—famous for portraying the Spock character in the Star Trek universe—did not set out to photograph naked fat women. He got lucky.
A talented and passionate photographer who built his own darkroom out of found parts as a teen, Nimoy has been creating black-and-white art photography since the early 1970s. As Houston Museum [...]

Inside, Out: The Self-Portraits of Guillermo Riveros

Monday, November 12th, 2007

Guillermo Riveros isn’t afraid of a little T and A—especially if it’s his A. His series Corrupta is an examination of gender identity with Guillermo as the star of every shot. The images are jarring, even disturbing—seemingly shot with zero hesitation. Images of the Virgin Mary and Jesus Christ can be found in Corrupta and [...]

Lost and Found: The Libertines of Folsom Street

Thursday, September 27th, 2007

by Rebecca Woolf
I have always been fascinated by outsiders, feeling quietly like one myself, hiding behind high fashion and well-manicured hair. Laughing out loud with friends, sometimes unaware of what we’re laughing about. What’s so funny?
I grew up in the suburbs where we all dressed like twins and drove matching cars with the same [...]

An interview with Jessica Bruder, author of Burning Book

Tuesday, August 21st, 2007

“Maybe you’re walking around the festival and a gaggle of motorized cupcakes whizzes past, while a troupe of French maids is trying, ineffectually, to tidy up the desert with feather dusters, all in the shadow of a barn-sized rubber duck with a jazz club in its belly. Then things will probably get weirder.”
On the eve [...]

Iraqi Graffiti: The Photos of Todd Bowers

Tuesday, July 24th, 2007

SMITH contributing editor Michael Slenske’s last story was a “Back Home from Iraq” feature on MoveOn’s VideoVet winner John Bruhns.
As far as Iraq war vets go, Marine reservist Todd Bowers might be the luckiest. During a routine patrol on the outskirts of Fallujah in the fall of 2004, his civil affairs unit was called to [...]

Back of the House: A Photo Essay By Michael Harlan Turkell

Wednesday, July 11th, 2007

It’s easy to like Michael Harlan Turkell. When the New York City-based photographer walks into Public (voted Best Brunch by TimeOut New York, by the way) he warmly greets the staff, already hard at work prepping for the long night ahead. It’s a little after 10 in the morning. Turkell apologizes for running late (he’s [...]

Catastrophe, Crisis, and Other Family Traditions: The Photos of Jessamyn Lovell

Sunday, July 1st, 2007

Jessamyn Lovell’s series, Catastrophe, Crisis, and Other Family Traditions, is a family portrait that is sure to strike a nerve with almost everyone. The Oakland, CA-based photographer’s work takes an honest look at her family, flaws and all. Lovell, a professor at Diablo Valley College in Pleasant Hill, CA, began photographing her family as a [...]

Beyond the Hoods: The Abu Ghraib Images of Daniel Heyman

Wednesday, June 6th, 2007

The hooded figure. That’s the image of Abu Ghraib that began living in our heads when The New Yorker published photographs taken by American soldiers along with Seymour Hersh’s historic Torture at Abu Ghraib article three years ago. By this point, the image has been significantly deadened—flattened and stylized into angry, well-intentioned iconography, the stuff [...]

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