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It’s 1983. A wet, frigid fall day after the leaves have turned from green to orange to withered brown and only the long impenetrable winter looms on the grey horizon. I am rushing between classes, in my final year at Dartmouth College. A man--a boy?-- gimps across the college green towards me. He has on a light beige windbreaker shocking for its lack of protection against the wind and …

He said, "I will always love you." I replied, "No you won't. You don't love me now." He hesistated, and then left.

His gait was careful, like someone stepping in places he couldn’t stand. Not that I blamed him, after all, this was ‘Freshman Territory,’ which must have been pretty disgusting for a full-grown Junior like himself. It’s only two years difference, but the maturity ranges from peeing on walls to applying to college.

Polite as he was, his face was completely emotionless, but his usual smile was absent. I …

I had left an abusive new husband as I went through evaluation of my master's thesis. In my committee chair's office, he informed me that I would not be continuing toward a Ph.D. He said this is called a Terminal Masters Degree. I was sad but okay up to this point. Then he said, "No one need ever know", and I felt the instant weight of …

When it finally happens, I think of seventh grade P.E. class, lined up on the blacktop. Figuring out how to snap my top retainer off of the roof of my mouth with my tongue and then click it back into place again. It took strength and suction control. Seemed like all the other kids with orthadonture knew how to do it, except for me.

When it finally happens, …

When my mother was diagnosed with fourth stage breast cancer I took a deep breath and said, "No, not us!" I had a family, three kids, one with autism, and there was no time to stop to care for my mother. But being a nurse, and loving my mother, I knew I had no choice. She was coming to my home to die, and her final battle with breast cancer …

I grew up in a lifestyle similar to the traditional American family that were on all the billboards in the early 1900's: parents with two kids (one girl and one boy) in a two story house (green shutters though, not blue) in the middle of a neighborhood. We even had the family dog. All we didn't have were the sidewalks and the white picket fence...our fence was about ten feet …

One night, when I was a freshman in college, I was worrying about what some classmates were thinking about something I had said. I realized suddenly that since I didn’t know what they thought, I was worrying about what I thought they thought. Since my thinking was under my control, I could stop worrying. I then took my thoughts one step further, asking whose thoughts about my …

“Daddy’s gone.”

I was a daddy’s girl. And I was thirty-seven years old when that was taken away. My mother was at my front door, shaking so hard her words wiggled. I thought she’d found another snake in the garage.

But it wasn’t that. She’d just received a phone call. The kind you don’t want.

"Gone?" I asked. "Gone …

Hold on. You said...let go?

In a bazaar series of serendipity, I picked up where my Great-grandfather left off. The Szarko Family Farm was sold in Hungary in the late 1800's allowing my Grandfather and his father to travel to America, First Class. I rather serendipitously joined the Business Club DECA at Camelback High School in Phoenix in 1969. This class alternative positioned me as a Sears, Roebuck & Co. Department Management …

Defining Moments:
Our lives are made up of moments; large and small, meaningful and unidentifiable. Among the moments that make up our lives, each of us experience “Defining Moments.” These are moments in our lives that change us forever.
Defining moments change your opinion of someone or something. They can change your view of a subject or the world at large. Bottom line, they change …
She died; he quit calling me.

I was standing in a training mock-up of Skylab, America's first space station, thinking, as I was wont to do, that I really would like to write a book about the Skylab program, and that I would like to write it with an astronaut who flew on Skylab, and dismissing it, as I was just as wont to do, by reminding myself that was the sort of thing that professional …

My moment occurred at Phoenix Arizona's Camelback High School in 1969 when I opted into DECA, Distributive Education Clubs of America. Joining DECA as a Senior entirely of my own volition, but influenced by the instructor who made the rounds to all Junior classes about the program, landed me a job at Sears Roebuck and Co.
My inner drive strength lead me to pursue the Division Management Training, where I …
The Agency Called. It's a Boy!

"Here try it," my roomate said. She pushed a lit cigarette towards my face. From then on I was not the goody goody but the rebel. From smoking and drinking to doing drugs my life was changed forever.

I spent so much time writting this novel. My brain was tired of thinking, I was misplacing words, the sentences were pathetic... And then I did it. I finished it.
And the relief... The joy! I finally had finished something I wrote, and it was good. At least I thought it was.
About half a year later I receive a letter from a publishing company saying they wanted to publish …

As a girl I had always relied on my dad to explain . . everything. Why snow fell on cold days. How to spell 'especially.' How to sort out algebraic equations.

I didn't always need his help. I remember coming home from school, propping up my books and getting to work. Most days I felt confident diving into my work without adult assistance. But …

"Do you want to know?" Of course we did, after two previous miscarriages, we certainly wanted to know the sex of our third progressing pregnancy as we'd never made it this far along before. As the ultrasound technician announced, "It's a girl," my husband and I both began to cry. He because he was so unbelievable happy. Me, because in that moment, the intensity of bringing a girl child into …
Jump to a page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 ... to infinity!

The Moment Book

Moments from the SMITH Community

Tomorrowland "Daisy, F3," my son Archer says as we pull into our parking spot. Disneyland’s about to open and we've arrived, just the two of us, our last hoorah before school starts. *** The alarm goes off and I pull the pillow tightly over my head. My husband, Hal, offers to wake the kids so I roll over, fall back asleep until Archer's voice wakes me, this time for good. "Hi, Mommy. It's …
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With Both Hands Whenever I think of my mother, my mind flips to this story. Not to the whole story, but right to the middle of it, the worst moments of it. For me, that's where the story always starts. My mother was beating the hell out of me. The first few blows seemed to come from every direction as I grabbed my nightgown and pulled it over my head, not …
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Reasons to be Thankful By Robert Israel They scraped me off the street, my bicycle in a heap nearby, and ever so gingerly placed me on the gurney. A crowd of curious onlookers watched intently, thankful they were not being loaded onto the ambulance. The nurses at the hospital were calming as nurses are wont to be, and administered an intravenous tube of morphine, and soon everything around me became fuzzy and numb, and the …
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Read More Community Moments →
 
SMITH Magazine

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